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The Crescent 



VOLUME XXXV 



NEWBERG, OREGON, MARCH 26, 1924 



NUMBER 9 



J 



GETTMANN WON FIRST 
HONORS INORATORY 

Pacific's Representative Annexed 
Title by Easy Margin 

Coming last on a list or nine ora- 
tors. Royal Gettinaim i epi eventing; 
Pacific College in the annual state 
oratorical contest, held at Linfield 
College, McMinnville, Friday March 



TRIUMPH PROMPTS JUBILEE 
BY STUDENTS AND FACULTY 




On Saturday evening, March 15 
a large number of studentQand faj 
ulty met on the athletic field for 
a big jubilee and weinie roast in. 
honor of the victory of the previous 
night. There was a larger turn-out 
than was expected, in spile of the 
many who wont home for the spring 
vacation. 

Many "peppy" games were played 
in and out of the light of the big 
bonfire. After the excess of ener- 
gies had been spent in shouting and 
rcmping. welniea began to sizzle 
around th ! fire. During the dis- 
posal of the "dog" and his team- 
mate, the bun, interesting speeches 
were made by Professor Conover, 
President Pennington, Royal Gett- 
man, and Helen Hester, all of which 
had to do more or less with oratory. 



ROYAL GETTMANN 
Winner of State Oratorical Contest. 

14, took first honors in one of the 
most closely contested fights for 
first place seen in recent years. 

Mr. Gettmann's subject "The Ku 
Klux Klan and National Unity" was 
timely and cleverly dealt with. Pre- 
senting his subject in a clear, logi- 
cal manner, and without prejudice, 
Mr. Gettmann won not only the 
decision of the judges, but apparent- 
ly was well received by all who 
heard him. In thought and compo- 
sition, Mr. Gettmann ranked sever- 
al points above his nearest rival. In 
delivety-Glie took third place which 
is creditable, considering the high 
class oratory shown throughout the 
contest by more experienced men. 

Second place was taken by the 
University of Oregon, while third 
was given to Pacific University, and 
the State Normal tied with Willam- 
ette University for fourth place. 

It is significant that each orator 
presented some phase of a social 
problem. Albany College came first 
on the program with the subject, 
"America First." This oration 
dealt with disregard to law. The 
speaker deplored mob violence, 
lynching, burning at the stake, and 
particularly violation of the nar- 
cotics law. The second orator rep- 
resenting Linfield College, spoke ef- 
fectively on "A Square Deal." The 
speaker who is a student from the 
Philippine Islands, had as an under- 
lying current to his oration, Filipi- 
no Independence. The third orator, 
a young woman from the Normal 
School in "The Other Half Gives," 
made a plea for the present genera- 



MAY DAY COMMITTEES 

Not a great deal is known of the 
plans for Pacific's May Day celebra' 
tion yet, but we are at least able to 
publish the names of the several 
committees who have the executive 
end of the work in hand: 

General chairman Florence Lee. 
Officials committee Louise Nel- 
son, chairman; Esther Haworth, Al- 
fred Everest. 

Float and grounds committee - 
Delight Cartel-, chairman; Hilma 
Heudricksou, John Chenevert. 

Parade and advertising commit- 
tee—Ralph Hester, chairman; Wen- 
dell Woodward, Elsie Allen. 

iFestivilAes committee — Miss 
^Clarke, chairman; Mrs. Michener, 
rown. 

Dinner committee — Olive Arm- 
strong, chairman; Mildred Choate, 
Eugene Hibbs. 

Sports committed — Harold Ri- 
nard, chairman; Mr. Michener, Hel- 
en Nordyke. 



BASKETBALL COACHES CLOSE 
SEASON WITH JOINT BANQUET 

February 29, at 9:00 p. m. found! 
a good sized group of young men 
and women in room 14 of Wood- . 
Mar Hall. ~fl ey appeared unusually j 
happy for Professors Midfeet— and 
Newlin were entertaining The baa- 1 
ketball boys of College and Acado \ 
my and their girl friends. 

The room was prettily decorated 
with daffodil:: and violets. When 
the guests were seated at the sever- 
al tables, they were served with 
sandwiches, chocolate, ice cream 
and wafers. After the eatables had 
disappeared, Professor Michener, as 
toastmaster, introduced the follow- j 
ins speakers of the evening Pro- j 
fer.sor Newlin; Fioyd Lienard; Fl->r- j 
ence Lee; Hubert Armstrong; Be.i i 
Huntington; William Swf->t; and 
President Pennington. Such topics 
ai^ "Goals," "Teamwork," "Shoot- 
ing," "Passing" and "ThP Tip-off" 
were spoken on, and the two coaches 
^pressed their appreciation of the 
oys' spirit and playing during the 
season. 

The College Song ended the 
evening, and everyone went home 
with a feeling of gratefulness in his 
heart for the hosts who had enter- 
tained so nicely. 

R. E. H. 



COLLEGE GIRLS LOSE 
TO ACADEMY SEXTET 

High School Six Wins From Pacific 
— Prospects Next Year Good 



(Continued on page four) 



LOCAL PEACE CONTEST 

The local Peace Oratorical contest 
was held in the chapel on March 13. 

The winning oration, "'It [Must 
Not Be Again," was presented in a 
very forceful manner and carried a 
strong appeal for peace. 

The oration, "The Negro Problem 
As a Root of War," took second 
place and third place was given to 
the oration entitled, "But The 
Greatest of These Is Love." 

The judges on thought and com- 
position were: Professor Weesner, 
Professor Newlin, and Miss Sutton; 
on delivery: Miss Lewis, Mrs. Con- 
over and President Pennington. 

The Peace Oratorical Contest will 
be held at Eugene in the near fu- 
ture. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Rev. Strevey of the Methodist 
church led Y. M. last Wednesday. 
The subject of his message was "A 
Consecrated Concentrated Effort." 

He told the story of Moses' ap- 
pointment by God to deliver the 
children of Israel from Egypt. He 
emphasized the fact that Moses of- 
fered many excuses to God, saying 
that he was not eapq gbje of the 
task. The young man in college is 
j continually receiving similar calls, 
and he, like Moses, is apt to offer 
excuses. Mr. Strevey pointed out 
that if one be chosen for a task, 
whether by his government, instruc- 
tor, or other authority, he should 
"make a consecrated concentrated 
effort to accomplish it." 

On Monday evening, March 10, a 
group of College and Faculty men 
had the privilege of meeting Gale 
Seeman, Coast Y. M. C. A. Secre- 
tary. 



Y. W. C. A. 
The meeting held March 12 was 
the final service under the old ad- 
ministration. The time was given 
over to the reading of reports and 
a review of the year's work. Those 
who heard these reports were great- 
ly impressed with the work of the 
Y. W. C. A for the past year. The 
next Y. W. meeting will be the in- 
stallation of the new officers and 
cabinet and there should be a large 
attendance at this beautiful service. 



TALK AND EAT CLUB MEETS 

On Monday evening, March 10, 
members of the Pacific College fac- 
ulty and their families, met in the 
Domestic Science laboratory for the 
first meeting of the "Talk and Eat 
Club. 

Professor Perisho, head of the de- 
partments of Biology and Chemistry, 
opened the discussion with a splen- 
did explanation of the Abrams the- 
ory of diagnosis. By means of a 
diagram, the leader for the evening 
j traced very clearly the method em- 
| ployed by the Abrams practitioners. 
. then followed a presentation of the 
! weak points of the method. 
| A number of those present took 
| part in the discussion of the prac- 
j tice which is taking thousands of 
dollars from the pockets of people 
] in different parts of the United 
States. A. N. 



The second game of the College- 
Academy series in girls' basketball 
was played off at 4:00 p. m., Thurs 
day afternoon, March 13. The game 
went to the Academy girls with a 
score of 23 to 22. During the first 
half, May Pearson, one of the Col- 
lege centers, played guard on the 
Academy team, doing such efficient 
work that her own team demanded 
her services for the second half. 

During the last quarter, Shorty 
got the habit of hitting the hoop 
and piled up five baskets in as many 
minutes. Up until that time the 
Academy had led with quite a mar- 
gin. The girls played a fast game 
and Mr. Michener as referee, kept 
things moving. 

The lineup was as follows: 
College Academy 
Nordye, 14 F 12, Choate 

Terrell, 4 F 11, Kendall 

Allen, 4 F 

Elliott C Gerritz 

Hendrickson C Bisbee 
Justus C 
Hester G Campbell 

Clough G Pearson 

Pearson G Carlisle 

The basketball girls met the high 
school six on our floor at 4:30 p. m. 
March 11. The high school sextet 
showed greater skill and agility 
with the ball, being old bands at 
the^)ganie, but an independence and 
Tfeeaom of rules. The first quarter 
was the one where N. H. S. piled 
up their largest score, while P. C. 
was able to outscore them by the 
last quarter. As P. C. has not had 
a first team, most of the girls were 
new to the game and several had 
never played together before. The 
final score was 16 to 7 in favor of 
the high school. 

Prospects for Next Year 

With as good a start as the girls 
have made this year there should be 
an excelleent team next year. The 
game was new to the majority of 
the players, the lateness with which 
the season opened here at P. C, 
the short hours for practice, and the 
fact that there was not to be a first 
team, have all stood in the way of 
developing the best team work, but 
this can easily come in another year. 



DRAMATICS 



Though not much has been heard 
of the plans made by the dramatics 
committee, work has been under 
way and it is hoped a full report 
will be made before long. Two 
short plays have been chosen, "The 
Neighbors," by Zona Gale, and 
"Tickless Time," by George Cran 
Cook and Susan Graspel. Accord- 
ing to the provisions made when the 
Student Body was given the right 
to present dramatics, the faculty 
has the final word about characters, 
so as soon as they decide on the 
cast it will be published. The com- 
mittee is very sorry .that the work 
has been so delayed that the plays 
cannot be given on the date hoped 
for. 



— 



THE CRESCENT 



El .'ered as second-class mall matter 
at Postoffice at Newberg, Ore. 



Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 



EDITORIAL 

Editor-in-chief Florence Lee 

Associate Editor Ivor Jones 

Departmental Editor 

Helen Robertson 

Faculty Advisor R. W. Lewis 

REPORTORIAL 

Society — Edna Doree; Sports— - 
Howard Nottage; Personals — Flor- 
ence Heater; Y. W. C. A. — Iris Hew- 
itt; Y. M. C. A. —Ralph Hester; 
Chapel — Emma Fort; Tr^fian — Hel- 
en Robertson; Commercial — Kath- 
erine Pettingil; Alumni — Miss 
Britt. 

MANAGERIAL 

Business Manager. . .Floyd Lienard 
Circulation Manager, Wilbur Elliott 



Terms; $1.00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 

VICTORY 

Basketball season is over. Base- 
ball and tennis are claiming the at- 
tention of Pacific's athletes. Stu- 
dents of Pacific, if you are out for 
a championship this year, it is up 
to you to back your teams to the 
limit in the coming contests.. Able 
material and knowledge are valua- 
ble assets in athletics, but unbeat- 
able morale is the winning quality. 
ROOT!! Root for VICTORY and 
you can't lose! 



CHAPEL NOTES 

The chapel exercises of March 6 
began with a Student Volunteer 
song by a quartet composed of Miss 
Lewis, Florence Lee, Mr. Michener 
and Mr. Conover. Following the 
quartet number Miss Lewis reviewed 
George Haynes' book, "The Trend of 
the Races," enumerating and dis- 
cussing the negro's contributions to 
civilization. 



On Monday, March 10, Lucille 
Clough, Eva Miles and Howard Not- 
tage had charge of the chapel per- 
iod. They presented a report of 
conditions under which students of 
Europe are suffering to obtain an 
education. The conditions in Rus- 
sia, it seems, are the worst; there 
many are living on bark and grass. 
Books in the European colleges are 
extremely scarce, as many as 200 
using one book in some places. 

A free will contribution from the 
students of Pacific resulted in 
$2,5.90 for the European Student 
Relief. 



IS IT FOR THE BEST? 

Dame Rumor has whispered of a 
proposed complete separation of col- 
lege and academy student bodies, 
and the developments of this pro- 
posal are current in the minds of 
the constructive thinkers of the in- 
stitution. Is it for a better Pacific, 
or will the old adage, "United we 
stand, divided we fall," hold true? 
Will it build a wholesome competi- 
tion, or will It foster aifj) antagonis- 
tic sentiment? These are the ques- 
tions being asked by those who have 
the welfare of the school at heart. 
This problem has long been a sub- 
ject for debates in Pacific, but it 
appears that" now definite action 
will be taken in the matter. It is 
an issue which vitally concerns ev- 
ery wide-awake student of Pacific 
College, and* it deserves honest 
thought and a solution that will be 
best for Pacific, both in the imme- 
diate future and in the years to 
follow. 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS 

Students, do you ever read the ad- 
vertisements in the Crescent? Do 
you do your trading at stores that 
advertise in the CrescentQ Do you 
patronize Crescent advertiser* 
These business men make the Cres- 
cent possible. Why should we not 
patronize them? 

Students, do you let the business 
men know that you are a student of 
Pacific. Let them know who you 
are and that it pays them to adver- 
tise in the Crescent. You can help 
your college paper in this way. 
What would a college be like with- 
out a school paper? In a school the 
size of Pacific we could not possibly 
finance a paper without the aid of 
the business men who so faithfully 
advertise. So help Pacific, help the 
business men and help the Crescent 
by trading with our advertisers. 



In a general survey of social and 
economic conditions beginning just 
prior to the Protestant Reformation 
Professor P. A. Parsons of the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, presented some of 
the social problems which are so 
acute today in society, and their 
causes. 

"It is the incompetent," said 
Professor Parsons, " who is unable 
to compete in the economic order of 
today, who gives us our social 
problems. Then," continued the 
gpeaker,®there is an enoronQis ,j>oP> - 
ulation dependent on wages, ancTTn 
time of depression these are thrown 
upon charity, and vast numbers are 
gathered into the slums where 
crime breeds wholesale." 

Prison and other reforms were 
discussed by the Professor, and the 
plan of social training as conducted 
by the Portland branch of the Uni- 
versity of Oregon Department of So- 
ciology was laid before the students. 
College graduates with an interest 
in human welfare work are pre- 
ferred. 



PERSONALS 



Dilla Tucker spent spring vaca- 
tion in Portland. 

Elsie Allen was at her home in 
Jefferson during spring vacation. 

Misses Rena and Mary Johnson 
were Portland visitors last week. 

Florence Lee spent the spring va- 
cation visiting with her brother in 
Seattle. 

Rose Ellen Hale and Bernice Hin- 
shaw enjoyed spring vacation in 
sunny California. 

Walter Cook was back at P. C. 
for a short visit Tuesday, March 11. 
Walter is working in Portland this 
year. 

EdithJfSanderman, formerly of P. 
C, now of Linfield, has been at 
home this last week, this being va- 
cation time at Linfield also. 

Emmabelle Woodworth, Alice 
Laudien, Bernice Newhouse and, we 
hear, but it has not been verified at 
the time of going to press, that Lou- 
ise Nelson also, have had an attack 
of "Bobitis." 



POST MORTEM 

Pacific's basketball season with 
one game to the Quakers' credit has 
not proved to be the success that 
was hoped for when the season 
started, yet the team composed of 
all new flien, but one, has received 
good preparatory work that will 
Prove a big sendoff for the season 
of 1924-'25. Armstrong at right 
guard played a consistent game 
throughout, and Brown showed 
Promise of developing into a first- 
class guard. Lienard, Woodward 
and Rinard improved greatly as the 
season advanced and will prove to 
have real ability in the game with 
the next season or two. Coach 
Michener was new on the job and 
worked under handicaptfjhowever, he ' 
has become thoroughly*- acquainted 
with the abilities of the men and 
will do much toward putting out a 
winning team next year. i 

J. C. 1 

The Academy certainly has no 
kick coming over its '23-'24 basket- 
ball season. Beginning with practi- 
cally no material in 1921 the Acad- 
emy has worked up to the team 
which just completed its season, los- 1 
ing but two games. The condition | 
of the team last season was c<msid- i 
erably brighter than it had b'-en in 
'21, but here was still room for a 
good deal of improvement. 

The most noticeable difference of 
this year's team from those of the 
two preceding years is that the team 
had more confidence in themselves. 
This probably is the greates reason 
for the good showing that was 
made. Before the season finished 
each member on the team felt that 
the team had the "stuff" and could 
"deliver it" if it came to a show- 
down. 

It is certain that without the 
coaching which it had^the team 
could not have made <^sas> the suc- 
cess it did, so, before closing, let's 
give three whole-hearted cheers for 
the coach who helped put P. A. on 
the map. W. M. S. 



Black 122 Office White 22 

SR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 
THE REXALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson - 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



TENNIS 

A great deal of enthusiasm over 
tjnis hasXshown among the students 
tms year. With only one letter man 
Dack, there is plenty of room for 
competition. However, the lack of 
experienced players will not be no- 
ticed seriously because of the 
amount and quality of the new ma- 
terial. 

Prospects for women's tennis are 
still brighter than for the men. All 
of last year's letter women are back 
and there is ample new material, so 
that the results aOhe end of the 
season should be very satisfactory. 

B. H. 



STAFF LUNCHEON HELD 

Tuesday noon, March 11, the 
Crescent staff enjoyed a lovely 
luncheon served by the Editor, in 
the Domestic Science room. Mem- 
bers of the staff were in manner in- 
troduced to those with whom they 
will work to attempt to make the 
Crescent what it is Intended to be. 
During the luncheon general plans 
were outlined, and several problems 
of publication were settled. It is 
the hope that the staff may meet in 
a similar way to discuss the plans 
for every issue, and each help the 
other with his particular job. 



In polite society, a bud is a girl 
who has not yet blossomed out into 
a wall-flower. 



NEWBERG LAUNDRY 

Good Work. Good Service. 



TRY US 



Congratulations! P. C. 

On Winning the State Oratorical 
Contest. You too, are "There with 
the Goods." 



Larkin-Prince Hard- 
ware Co. 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



FRANK B. LAYMAN 
Attorney-at-Law 



CITY HALL 



STUDENTS— 

For the easiest shave 
and most up-to-date 
hair cut, go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 

OPPOSITE -THE POST OFFICE 



CREDE'S MARKET 

Our Specialty: 
Our own make of sugar cured 
hams, bacon, and bacon backs, 
lard and all kinds of sausage. 

Quality and Service Counts 



F. E. ROLLINS 
Jeweler 

Fine Watch Repairing 
Pens Straightened 

711 FIRST STREET 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Anderson Motor 
Company 

STAR AND 
STUDEBAKER 

Sales and Service 

Associated Oil Products 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



/ 



THE P. A, ASKUS 



r 



VOLUME I 



NUMBER 6 



THE P. A. ASKUS 



Entered in the Crescent as very 
classy matter. 

Published every time by the Cres- 
cent. 



Philip Haworth Editor 

George Poott Assoc. Ed. 

Ret ha Tucker. ... Fourth Yr. News 

Rose Ellen Hale Third Yr. News 

Johanna Gerrits. . .Second Yr. News 
Mabel Kendall .... First Yr. News j 
Ivor Jones Joke Editor 

Editorial Policy 

1. Get the best news, in the beat 
style, and we'll have the best paper. 

2. Boost Pacific Academy. 

3. Back Pacific College. 

Terms: Pay for the Crescent in 
advance and you get the Askus. Buy 
a single copy and you get it anyway. 



and they could not control their ex- 
huberance. 

The Third Years held a class 
meeting last Tuesday noon at which 
some important plans were made. 

Someone in English III. — "Thor- 
eau lived until he died in 1862." 

Stanley in Caesar class — "The 
Swabians had no clothing except 
their outer skins." 

Two boys, puzzled as to study or 
ball for an occupation — First: 
"Let's toss up and see what we 
should do." Second: "Heads and 
tails we go to the ball game. If >t 
rests on its side, we'll study." 



FOURTH TEAR HIGH BROW 

The English IV class has devel- 
oped many startling and hitherto 
unknown characteristics, physically 
as well as mentally, during the past 
few days. One member has no eyes, 
another no ears, and another no 
sense. These astonishing facts 
were brought to light when some 
essays modeled after those of Lamb 
were being read. 

Emmabell thinks that any author 
who will fill his bathtub with man- 
uscripts is certainly Insane. 

Someone ought to give Mildred a 
carpenter's job. She has been hav- 
ing considerable experience on her 
own desk. 

The Fourth Years are having a 
hard time to find commencement 
invitations that suit everyone. 

The Physics class learned lately 
that Bernlce was "all in," (mean- 
ing her physics experiments). 

Now do you know why Emmabell 
and Alice were so anxious for spring 
vacation ? 

A sleepiness has been noticed In 
American History class lately and a 
report was taken of how late the 
boys had been out. Miss Sutton — 
"And now, Retha, we'll have your 
report." 



If 

Kissing a miss 
Is 

Kissing amiss 
Are 

There any more blisses 
In 

Kissing a Mrs.? 



SECOND YEAR LOWER BROW 

Everyone has been wondering 
I why Phil Gatch has been so puffed 
I up of late. This is the solution. 
I He eats four dishes of puffed wheat 
every morning. 

In History II, (Hedwig Schaad) 
— "Henry VIII was a good king in 
the beginning of his reign but after 
he had six wives he was much 
changed, rfp 

Have you ever heard a magpie? 
If not, just listen to Landon in His- 
tory n and you will have a good 
conception of one. 

The second years entertained 
themselves with a St. Patrick's Day 
program recently. 

D. C. won from L. M. in tennis 
several days ago. 

A long distance telephone has 
been invented by a second year, 
which makes possible communica- 
tion with occupants of the other 
world. 

The second years of the Friends 
Sunday school lost a return basket- 
ball game to the Presbyterians by a 
score of 23 to 20. 

The second years have written 
letters to the Garden Grove sopho- 
more class In Iowa, and are anxious- 
ly waiting for replies. 



landon Mccracken is host 

j Sunday was red letter day for 
four boys. Landon McCracken en- 
tertained Homer Hester, George 
Foott and Philip Gatch with a de- 
licious dinner at his home after 
church. This was especially appre- 
ciated by the dorm boys. (Thanks 
to Mrs. McCracken.) After playing 
some games they all went for a 
ride up to Mac and back in time for 
supper and church services. All 
agreed on one thing, that it was the 
best afternoon they had spent for 
a long time. — By One of Them. 



THIRD YEAR LOW BROW 

We are glad to report that Rosa 
Aebischer is recovering from her ill- 
ness. 

The cause of the hurricane last 
Tuesday in the study hall was that 
Rose Ellen and Bernice found out 
that they could go home together. 



A CHAPTER ON SENSE 

(Apologies to Lamb.) 

I have no sense — 

Mistake me not reader — nor 
imagine I am by nature destitute of 
those interior clockworks, grayish 
ornaments, and (generally speak- 
ing) but little shown in any way to 
the world. 

Better nobody should ever sus- 
pect that I am more delicately than 
copiously blessed with those mar- 
velous creatures they call brains 
which sometimes keep a person out 
of the asylum and many times don't. 

Neither have I incurred or done 
anything to be put into an institu- 
tion for the feeble minded, crimi- 
nally inclined, blind, aged, crippled, 
or place of internment for those who 
are pecuniarly embarrassed, having 
only been in the Academy for three 
years. 

When you understand me to say 



PERCENTAGES OP ORATORICAL CONTEST 



College 


Delivery 


Composition 


Final Ave. 


1. Pacific College 


. . .89.12 


92.23 


90.75 






97. 


87.77 


i. Pacific University 


. , ,90.75 


83.66 


87.20 


4. Willamette University . 


. .83.62 


90.33 


86.97 


Eugene Bible University 


. . .87.62 


86.33 


86.97 



that I have no sense— you will, of 
course, understand me to mean sense 
of humor. 

To say that I have never laughed, 
giggled, guffawed, he-hawed or 
smothered at any of the multifari- 
ous happenings of my aged life 
would be to falsify. What I wish 
to say is that at some funeral or 
English or Caesar class I can never 
seem to have, understand, see or 
make out any sense (^f) humor at all. 

BASEBALL PROSPECTS GOOD 

Some twenty or twenty-five fel- 
lows have turned out for baseball 
practice, and the outlook for a win- 
ning team is good, although only 
four of last year's regulars are at 
school this year, there are two let- 
ter men of previous years back on 
the job, and a number of promising 
aspirants who are showing up very 
well. We start the season out by 
playing Albany here, April 25. 

This year we have two coaches. 
Coach Michener and Coach Newlin, 
and they are not loitering on the 
job trying to organize a winning 
team. 

Gus Hanke, Phil Haworth, and 
Wendell Woodward are working out 
as pitchers. Hanke is a south-paw, 
a fielder of great renown from the 
New berg high school. Haworth has 
had no college experience in hurling 
the ball but he has the beef to put 
the goods on it. Woodward pitched 
two games last year, filling in the 
position of shortstop while Grub 
Crozer was in the box. 

Eldon Everest, last year's catcher 
and star center field. Is on the re- 
ceiving end at present and will 
probably be the regular catcher. 

Eugene Hibbs, John Chenevert 
Bill Sweet and Floyd Lienard are 
all trying to hold down the first 
sack, and there promises to be good 
competition. Hibbs is the star fir 
baseman from Idaho. Harlan RjL, 
nard promises to do good work at 
second. 

Shortstop's position as yet is un- 
filled, but there are a number of 
Promising ball scoopers. 

Third base will probably be occu- 
pied by either Harold R»)iard, let- 
ter man of three years back, Wes- 
ley Schaad, or Floyd Lienard. 

Several good men are trying out 
for field, among whom the * most 
promising are: Harold R@iard, 
Lawrence Crozer, Spud Everest, 
Wilbur Elliott, Wesley Schaad, Hol- 
land Schaad, Ego, Phil Gatch, Stan- 
ley Kendall and Wesley Hollings- 
worth. W. W. 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



FAIR VARIETY STORE 

Wallace & Son 



We sell everything in Notions 
Come in and look around 



TENNIS BALLS 
Fresh from factory every month. 

Don't think that we don't have 
BASEBALL goods, because we do 

PARKER HARDWARE CO. 



C. J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



KEENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 

Best of Bread: Finest Cakes. 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



All Kinds of 
GROCERIES AND CANDY 

— at — 

J. L. VAN BLARICOM'S 
Let us quote you prices 



TREFIAN 

Wednesday, March 5, was the 
last meeting of the Academy Trefian 
with the girls of the college. This 
will make a much smaller attend- 
ance than heretofore, and the acad- 
emy girls will be greatly missed. 
The program for the afternoon was 
taken up at the close of the business 
meeting. Due to the absence of sev- 
eral of the girls the first part was 
not rendered and Edna Christie 
and Olive Kendall talked on Hindu- 
ism and 1 Buddhism, the history and 
characteristics of the two religions. 
Some very interesting and weird 
things were learned about those two 
beliefs. The critic's report was giv 
en and the meeting adjourned. 



BOB WALKER 
Shoe Shine Parlor 

Ladies' Suede Shoes a Speciality 
CANDIES AND GUM 
STAGE DEPOT 



MJCHELIN TIRES and TUBES 
VULCANIZING and REPAIRS 

DOYLE'S TIRE SHOP 

Phone Red 244 



Newberg Graphic 

FINE PRINTING 

OF ALL KINDS 



Come Again and 
Gain Again 

That's what happens when you 
trade here for everything you 
eat and wear. 

Miller Mercantile Co. 

"Good Goods" 



A FORD 

Is what you want. Fords are 
what we have. Come In and take 
your pick. 

NEWBERG MOTOR CO, 



DR. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physfcian & Surgeon 

Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171 
Office over U. S. National Bank 



E. C. BAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 
Phone Red 37 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



DR. A. M. DAVIS DR. I. R. ROOT 
DENTISTS 

Over Ferguson's Drug Store 
Phone White 38 



A. C. SMITH 

Dealer in Leather Goods 
Auto Tops a Speciality 

703 First Street 



NEWBERG CYCLE COMPANY 

EARL HUTCHINSON, Prop. 

The Sporting Gocds Store 

Motorcycles, Bicycles, Supplies 
and Repairing 

r \ 

A LIFE INSURANCE 

With accident Policy —Just what 
a student needs. 

MRS. MINNIE COOPER 
Resident Agent 1254 First St. 
West Coast Life New berg, Or. 



Will B. Brooks 
Printer 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
Cleaning Pressing Repairing 

RYGG THE TAILOR 

PHONE BLACK 180 



COMMERCIAL PARTY 

On Friday, the 7th, from 4 until 
5:30 o'clock the commercial de- 
partment, including all of the old 
students available, were entertaine.l 
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Pen- 
nington. The party was given in 
honor of the patron saint of Ire- 
land, old St. Patrick. The guests 
were urged to hunt for the Irish 
national flower, or symbol, the 
shamrock, and after much excite- 
ment ,and hunting in every conceiv- 
able place, those having the largest 
number of shamrocks bearing the 
initial "G" were lined up on one 
side of the room, and those having 
the largest number of shamrocks 
bearing the initial "S," were lined 
up on the other side. The two sides 
then tried to spell each other down 
on a current event, an Irish saying, 
an Irish name beginning with "G," 
or "S" respectively. The guests 
were then served with delicious re- 
freshments followed by a "salad ," 
The "salad" consisted of green 
crepe paper containing an order for 
each guest. Singing, story telling, 
the telling of Irish jokes, and piano 
playing were the commands given 
and all were obeyed much to the 
pleasure of everyone. 

Many interesting things were 
learned about the ancestors of some 
of the guests present and we hope 
■they were all told with a proper re- 
spect for the facts. After every- 
thing was quiet. Miss Johnson was 
presented with a bouquet of snap- 
dragons in appreciation of her work 
as a friend and teacher. Everyone 
appreciated the very enjoyable time 
Those present were the regular com- 
mercial students, Miss Mary John- 
son, M'ss Ferguson, Lucille John- 
son, Marie Hester, Alfred Everest, 
Berlha Mae Pennington and Mr. 
and Mrs. Pennington. 



You Get Your Money's Worth 
at the 
GEM BARBER SHOP 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

School Supplies and 
Stationery 

H. A. Cooley, Proprietor 



A. MORRIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



CAMPBELL'S 

CANDIES 



ALWAYS 



The Best 



W. H. BEST 

W. W- HOWETT 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

WATER METERS 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Deliver before and after school 
Phone Red 66 
MOORE & SON 



GETTMANN WON FIRST 

HONORS IN ORATORY 

(Continued from page one) 



DR. THOS. W. HESTER 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, -:- OREGON 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 

STORE OP QUALITY 



500 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



YOU WILL LIKE 
Our Shoe Repair Service 

Better and Better Each Day 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES 



EVANS 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

311 First Street 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

ELGIN VAN BLARICOM 



tion of students to turn toward the 
rural districts where the need is so 
great for trained social workers, 
preachers and teachers. The Ore- 
gon Agricultural College gave the 
fourth oration, dealing with crimi- 
nal life and the necessity for more j 
strict law enforcement. "The Court ! 
of Last Appeal" was the title of this 
oration. Willamette University was 
fifth on the program, with the sub- 
ject, "The Great Advance." This j 
oration was a splendid criticism of 
the church, and the speaker Insisted | 
that what America needed most was I 
real religion. Oregon came next 
with "The Call to Service." This 
was the oration winning second 
place. The delivery was below par, 
but in thought and composition th° 
oration ranked high. It dealt with 
life in Oregon and the opportunity > 
to help build up the state by pre- 
venting waste of natural resources, 
and the developing of other indus 
tries. "A World Court of Interna- 
tional Justice" delivered by the man 
representing Pacific University won 
third place and was a good peace 
oration. Eugene Bible University' 
came eighth on the program. The 
speaker dealt with the old theme of \ 
child labor. It was a fine discourse 
on the evils of the industries which 
grind out the lives of the young be- 
fore they have a chance to develop 
into normal human beings. The last 
oration was that given by Mr. Gett- 
mann, taking first place. I 
On the whole the orations were 
above par, and delivery was good by 
i all the orators. The winning ora- 
tor, Mr. Gettmann, will represent 
the state of Oregon in April, at Cor- 
vallis, when Oregon will compete 
against California and Washington. 
If Mr. Gettman wins this contest, it 
! will mean not only a big honor for 
| Pacific College, but for the state of 
Oregon as well. B. D. 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



Watches Jewelry Clocks 

E. G. REED 
Watch and Clock Repairing 

All Work Guaranteed 
906 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 
X-Ray Diagnosis 



OVER U. S. BANK 



GAS ADMINISTERED 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 

Capital, Surplus and Profits $125,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ESTBLISHED 1889 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



1 
J 



"Rosebud Flour" 

MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFACTORY